Why IT and the business don’t trust each other

Ask any business operations head what they think of their IT department and they will moan about IT being too slow, not connected enough to business strategy, too focussed on its own goals, too expensive, not addressing everyday business needs etc.

In truth, most experienced business heads are a bit more pragmatic than that.  They understand the IT side of the argument.  The importance of data integrity and security, system stability, centralised procurement of technology, coherent architectural strategy.

Whilst these are all very plausible and necessary requirements, the fact is that the speed of modern business requires operational responses measured in hours and days, rather than the months and years associated with traditional IT projects.

IT people are not dumb.  They recognised this ages ago.  Initiatives like SOA and BPMS are designed to provide business flexibility, speed of response, agility.  But these are major IT programmes in themselves and in business eyes can take too long to deliver even small benefits.  They can also be disproportionately costly, so the economic case only makes sense for major business requirements.  What about the 750 item (and growing) change list?

The business is coming under ever greater pressure to reduce headcount so the old option of simply recruiting a few more operational staff is no longer available.

The result is that well intentioned business ops people create their own solutions under the guise of “end user computing” but more likely referred to by EAs as “Rogue IT”.  Spreadsheets, local databases, emulator macros, even amateur VB programming.  All delivered without any control, governance or thought for future maintenance.  So, guess who gets called in to fix a “mission critical” system when the creators have moved on?

No wonder IT doesn’t trust the business to do IT.

The last thing IT needs is maverick business users creating their own solutions, so maybe they clamp down on end user computing, causing further frustration in the business.  A spiralling circle of distrust is normally masked by a resigned acceptance of “that’s just the way things are”.

Random quote I’ve heard from an operational head “IT have slowed the organisation down to a pace where we can’t react to business opportunities and it takes an age to get anything done”.

Random quote I’ve heard from an EA “Business Ops are continually doing their own skunkworks initiatives with no regard to data protection laws, system resilience, disaster recovery or central IT strategy and yet when they fall flat on their face, it becomes our problem to fix”.

As an external vendor interacting with business and IT, I can genuinely see both sides of this argument.  I also think there are ways of reconciling the two views.  More in a later post.

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